Archive | March 2011

Bald Eagle Pictures

Color and Size
The feathers of newly hatched Bald Eaglets are light grey, and turn dark brown before they leave the nest at about 12 weeks of age. During their third and fourth years, Bald Eagles have mottled brown and white feathers under their wings and on their head, tail and breast. The distinctive white head and tail feathers do not appear until Bald Eagles are about 4 to 5 years old. Their beak and eyes turn yellow during the fourth and fifth year, and are dark brown prior to that time. Bald Eagles are about 29 to 42 incles long, can weigh 7 to 15 pounds, and have a wing span of 6 to 8 feet. This makes them one of the largest birds in North America. Females are larger than males. Bald Eagles residing in the northern U. S. are larger than those that reside in the south. They have a life span of up to 40 years in the wild, and longer in captivity.

Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle Pictures
Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle Pictures
Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle Pictures
Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle Pictures
Bald Eagle
Bald Eagle Pictures

Bottlenose Dolphins Pictures

The bottlenose dolphin belongs to the family Delphinidae in the suborder Odontoceti, order Cetacea. It is classified as Tursiops truncatus.
Bottlenose Dolphin, best-studied and generally the best-known species of dolphin. It occurs along almost all tropical and temperate coasts to about latitude 40° south and to latitude 45° north, and around the British Isles it occurs up to latitude 60° north. Bottlenose dolphins are coastal in most areas and remain in groups of usually fewer than 20, although offshore varieties also exist in many places and, in deep water, groups can be as large as 200. Some populations make seasonal migrations.

Bottlenose Dolphins
Bottlenose Dolphins Pictures
Bottlenose Dolphins
Bottlenose Dolphins Pictures
Bottlenose Dolphins
Bottlenose Dolphins Pictures
Bottlenose Dolphins
Bottlenose Dolphins Pictures
Bottlenose Dolphins
Bottlenose Dolphins Pictures
Bottlenose Dolphins

Bluebirds

Because bluebirds lack a strong bill to excavate a cavity for nesting, they depend on finding the used cavities of other birds or man-made houses. Bluebird populations had declined steadily over the years due to habitat loss. But, thanks to man-made houses, they are making a comeback. Our Wild Birds Unlimited bluebird boxes are designed with the birds in mind. They are designed for easy monitoring of the nest. The top can be lifted for viewing without disturbing the nestling and for easy photography
Bluebirds

Bluebirds

Bluebirds

Bluebirds
Bluebirds
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Bluebirds

Bluebirds

Bluebirds

Bluebirds

Bluebirds

nile crocodile

The Nile crocodile has a somewhat deserved reputation as a vicious man-eater. The proximity of much of its habitat to people means run-ins are frequent. And its virtually indiscriminate diet means a villager washing clothes by a riverbank might look just as tasty as a migrating wildebeest. Firm numbers are sketchy, but estimates are that up to 200 people may die each year in the jaws of a Nile croc.
nile crocodile

nile crocodile

nile crocodile

nile crocodile

nile crocodile

nile crocodile

australian kangaroo

The kangaroo is one of Australia’s most iconic animals, and most species are endemic to Australia. There are over 60 different species of kangaroo and their close relatives, with all kangaroos belonging to the super family Macropodoidea (or macropods, meaning ‘great-footed’). The super family is divided into the Macropodidae and the Potoroidae families.

The Macropodidae (macropod) family includes kangaroos, wallabies, wallaroos, pademelons, tree-kangaroos and forest wallabies. Species in the macropod family vary greatly in size and weight, ranging from 0.5 kilograms to 90 kilograms. The Potoroinae (potoroid) family of kangaroos includes the potoroo, bettong and rat-kangaroo, which live only in Australia.
australian kangaroo

australian kangaroo

australian kangaroo

australian kangaroo

australian kangaroo

australian kangaroo

australian kangaroo

australian kangaroo

endangered animals

Endangered animals are those species that are in danger of going extinct. Their reproductive rates are lower than their mortality rates over long periods of time, so their numbers are diminishing. The reasons for this are varied, but lately, very often involves a loss of habitat as people encroach on their living areas.

When a species is listed as endangered or threatened, it is not a death sentence. Many animals, like the bald eagle and the American alligator, were on the brink of extinction and are now recovering. Many species, however, will not recover, and could be lost forever.

Throughout time, animal species have been going extinct (long before people evolved); paleontologists estimate that well over 90 percent of all plant and animal species that ever existed have gone extinct.
endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

endangered animals

Eagle attack

Not the best technicals on this one, but this action of the eagle attacking it’s prey is a classic image in my mind. Look at those talons, like grappling hooks, nature is amazing!
Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

Eagle attack

alligator attacks zebra

The American alligator is a rare success story of an endangered animal not only saved from extinction but now thriving. State and federal protections, habitat preservation efforts, and reduced demand for alligator products have improved the species’ wild population to more than one million and growing today.
alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

alligator attacks zebra

Kudu

Distribution:
Found throughout South Africa with large numbers occurring outside conservation areas
Habitat:
They can be found in hilly areas, slopes of mountains with trees, woodlands, bush thickets, riverine areas, bushveld and wooded savannah areas.
Habits:
They congregate mainly in small herds (3 to 20) – usually cows with their young. Adult bulls are solitary or in bachelor groups. Adult Bulls that have won the right to mate will join herds of females in mating season.
Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Kudu

Waterbuck

Waterbuck naturally occur in the northern parts of South Africa, Mpumalanga, North West, KwaZulu–Natal and Eastern Cape. In these regions they can be found in private game reserves, farms, provincial parks and reserves as well as in National Parks like Kruger National Park, Mapungubwe National Park and Marakele National Park. They have also been reintroduced on many farms, game and nature reserves as well as in some parks and reserves throughout South Africa.
Waterbuck

Waterbuck

Waterbuck

Waterbuck

Waterbuck

Waterbuck